Arezki Daoud

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Can Shokri Ghanem Step In and Should Libya Become a Federated State?

[By Alessandro Bruno and Arezki Daoud] As Libya slides down the abyss of protracted political turmoil, the main question remains who will succeed the leadership of Mu’ammar al-Qadhafi. Unlike Egypt and Tunisia, Libya has no viable institutions, including the army, able to act as a glue and pilot a transition period. Qadhafi is not the president of Libya in the same way that Ben Ali or Mubarak was in Tunisia and Egypt. Qadhafi’s official role is ‘Brother leader of the Fatah Revolution’, a role that has no possible successor.
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Tunisia PM Ghannouchi Quits, Veteran Politician Essebsi is Replacement

Mohammed Ghannouchi, Tunisia’s long time Prime Minister under the infamous Ben Ali, and then interim Premier in the current government, announced his resignation today, Sunday February 27, 2011. His assignment as interim PM has been rocked with controversies, as millions of Tunisians were not comfortable with a former regime operative leading the transition, despite his status of a technocrat....
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Ghaddafi’s Obscure Exit Plan and Tribe Alliance against him Spell Trouble for Libyan Oil Fields

[Arezki Daoud | The North Africa Journal] While Libya’s share of the world energy sector is not substantial in itself, it maintains some 10% market share of the European Union’s imports and that’s not a small number. The Libyans have been aggressive expanding their reach of international markets as they continued to raise production. They have made substantial inroads in the Southern Europe, in particular Italy, as well as Germany. So any protracted disruption to production or along the supply chain could cause sustained stress in the international oil markets. The enfolding drama in Libya could have a much bigger damaging effect due to market psychology, and today the news from Libya is not good. ...
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Muamar Ghaddafi and his Bloody Finishing

[Arezki Daoud | The North Africa Journal] Can Muamar Ghaddafi really make it until March or will the Arab revolution add a new name in its February head-hunting list? It looks as if four decades of Muamar’s reign of terror are coming to an end. Many of his key diplomats have resigned and have been mounting a media attack against him. His representatives abroad no longer represent him. At home, he is no doubt currently looking for a new place to land and I have the weird feeling that King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia will come to the rescue of his brotherly dictator like he did for Ben Ali and Mubarak. Muamar's exit though is not without turmoil. On the ground, the Libyan people are facing”genocide", a term used by Ibrahim Dabbashim, the second man in command in the Libyan mission in the UN. ...
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Revolt in Libya, Toughening Regime

[The North Africa Journal] Arab fury has reached Libya, a country we expected to withstand the storm given the nature of its political landscape. But Benghazi showed once again that it can revolt if its people are repressed and are given the opportunity to raise their voices. Thursday, the unrest expanded outside of Banghazi, and on Friday, the funerals of those who were killed in the events could further escalate the crisis after the Friday prayers. Meanwhile, the regime is currently deploying a large number of police forces to contain the population ahead of the Friday prayers. ...
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The Egyptians did not Let us Down: Arab Regimes Still Standing Are Put on Notice

[The North Africa Journal] I admit there was a moment of fear that I felt when I thought the demonstrators in Egypt would give up on their fight, after they took over what the Tunisians started. Happily, the honorable people of Egypt won their battle for democracy opening the door for similar action in dictatorial nations. The battle of Egypt was of a historical proportion and the victory, finally, went to common sense. If Mubarak won, hundreds of millions of Arabs, minus the Tunisians, perhaps, would also be swept by a severe defeat that would take decades to fix. ...
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One Foot In, One Foot Out: Mubarak Still Clinging to Power

[The North Africa Journal] We continue to believe that the ousting of Hosni Mubarak is inevitable. His full resignation did not come today, further deepening the country's state of crsis. But he will ultimatly go. He must go for the sake of his country's stability and that of the region. But he cannot go with empty luggage. His Vizier, Omar Suleiman must also go. He is a major liability given that he has been part of the problem for so long. His latest statements about democracy in Egypt and the role of "outsiders" in instigating the rebellion are indicative of an out-dated mindset that must be retired....
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Military Junta’s Total Takeover in Egypt: The Vizier is Back.

Let’s face it, the Egyptian people are not getting what they want because of the military junta. Mubarak remains comfortable on his seat and the government was reinforced by corrupt military commanders that are loyal to the dictator. At its top are Omar Suleiman and a bunch of Generals that are quickly chipping away the legitimate body of demands of the Egyptian people. And they are now doing everything they can to slow the process and force the demonstrators back home. ...
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Author info
image Arezki Daoud Arezki Daoud is a leading analyst on North African affairs. He has been editor of The North Africa Journal since 1996. The publication reaches over 50,000 decision makers worldwide. Having lived and worked in North Africa, Mr. Daoud's analytical expertise on the region spans from the energy and industrial sectors to security and political affairs. Arezki is familiar with the speech circuit and briefing the business and government communities on the countries of the Maghreb region and is widely quoted in the press.
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