the north africa journal






 



 










227th Issue: October 2011 ---- Download full PDF version here

Libya: The Aftermath
Post-Gaddafi Analysis:
Deepening Crisis Expected in the Sahel and Beyond

The crisis in Libya, even as the Gaddafis fade away, is setting the stage for what appears to be a looming and guaranteed crisis in the region, and potentially beyond. With the proliferation of weapons, an abundance of former pro-Gaddafi fighters, combined with the massive movement of migrants from Sub-Sahara Africa, the Sahel region is bracing for further destabilization. Already the source of terrorism, organized crime, failed states and misery, the Sahel can become an even more dangerous battleground if the affected nations’ governments do not make a concerted effort and collaborate as a common front...

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More on the Libyan Crisis:

Manipulated, the Vulnerable Touaregs in Search for a Way Forward

Op-Ed: The Second Arab Revolution Coming: Arab Rulers, You Have Been Warned!

Gaddafi’s Death: Summary Execution is the Most Likely Scenario

Sirte Liberated, Gaddafi Dead


Social and Political Unrest in the Arab World
Despair and Self-Immolation in Algeria

It is ironic how Africa’s second largest economy is unable to cope with its housing shortage. The situation is so bad that virtually all riots and too many recorded suicides are the result of housing despair. For politicians and the regime, this seemingly simple issue is also source of constant trouble in a nation that has the financial means and wherewithal to deal with its problem in just a matter of a couple of years, good will permitting. The housing crisis is not the only culprit. Unemployment, police brutality, social exclusion, and societies that are too demanding on their youth are among the various factors that are leading many to commit suicide in gruesome ways, pushing others to revolt...

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Social and Political Unrest in the Arab World
Morocco: A Protest Movement Facing Headwinds

Created in the aftermath of the Jasmine Revolution of Tunisia, the Moroccan pro-democracy movement called the February 20th Movement resumed its activities in mid-September through a series of marches in the nation’s largest cities. Despite the presence of pro-democracy militants calling for political and economic rights for all, the movement weakened considerably due to the Monarchy’s response to the protests. Albeit of cosmetic nature, the King’s initiative to make basic tweaks to the constitutions has taken some momentum away from the movement. The demonstrations that took place in Rabat on September 11th drew less than one thousand demonstrators. In Rabat, they were between 2,000 and 3,000...

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Tunisia's Economy:
Foreign Investors Scale Back Exposure to Tunisia

The Tunisian government says the economy will growth this year at a rate of 0.2% to 1%. Although confirming the weakness facing the domestic economy amid intense political turmoil, the figure shared by Minister of Planning and International Co-operation Abdelhamid Triki, still represents an optimistic scenario. North Africa Journal Editors assume that the country is likely to move into recession instead with a contraction of about -3%...

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More on the Libyan Crisis:


Tunisia’s Public Debt Nears 26 billion Dinars

Tunisia Central Bank Cuts Interest Rate to Help Sagging Economy

North African Economic Notes


Special Report | Diplomacy:
French-Algerian Relations: The Weight of History

By Dr. Yahia H. Zoubir
Professor of International Studies/Director of Research in Geopolitics, Euromed Management, Marseille, France

In 1974, Algeria’s President Houari Boumediene declared that, “Relations between France and Algeria may be good or bad, but in no way can they be trivial.” Twenty-six years later, in 2000, his long-time foreign minister and now Algeria’s President, Abdelaziz Bouteflika (1999-present) declared that, “Algeria seeks to have extraordinary, non trivial, not normal, [but] exemplary and exceptional relations with France.” Yet, despite this willingness to turn the page, which, as Boumediene suggested, “cannot be torn up,” relations have often been marred with misunderstandings, conflicts, mutual suspicions and mistrust. Under President Jacques Chirac’s presidency, it seemed that the two countries were heading toward a historic treaty of friendship in 2005. Unfortunately as is often the case, a deceitful incident, concocted in Paris by forces opposed to lasting reconciliation between the two countries, derailed that process. Following a promising start under the presidency of Nicolas Sarkozy, relations quickly went from bad to worse, at least until the last couple of months which seem to have augured yet another hopeful development in relations, as is customary: through economic relations. What are the main obstacles in Franco-Algerian relations? Can they be overcome? What are the reasons for the current seeming rejuvenation of those relations? It is extremely difficult to write a short essay on the so-complex Algerian-French relations. Therefore, I will review some of the most salient factors which have impeded better ties between these two Mediterranean countries whose fate is bound by inescapable historical, political, economic, cultural, and human dimensions...

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Election News:
Islamist Ennahda Party Wins Big in Tunisia's First Free Elections

The Islamists of the Ennahda Party have won a major victory. Preliminary results of the votes of Tunisian expatriates abroad set the stage for what to expect within Tunisia proper when the results are announced. Ennahda has won 9 of the 18 seats allocated to the Tunisians living abroad, according to election authority "Instance Supérieure Indépendante pour les Eléctions" of ISIE.

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The Second Arab Revolution Coming
By Arezki Daoud

Muamar Gaddafi would not go down without creating collateral damage, not just in his country but also among his fellow dictators. Bashar Al Assad of Syria, Ali Abdallah Saleh of Yemen and so many other Arab rulers have been warned: Find a political solution very soon or risk a bad ending. Arab dictators will now witness an acceleration of public action against them, strengthened by the outcome of the Libyan crisis, call it Arab Revolution Version 2.0. ...Continue here.


Cement Sector: Morocco Cement Industry Facing Oversupply

Media Market: Algeria to Liberalize TV and Radio Markets

Rail/Transport: French Firms to Manufacture Electric Equipment for Morocco Rail

Rail/Transport: Morocco's High-Speed Train Coming

Telecommunication: Africa's 3G Revolution: Operators in Africa to Benefit from New Offerings



SALIM Insurance (Tunisia)

Tuninvest Announcement

Attijari Leasing Tunisia Unit: Threshold crossed

Attijari Bank Tunisia Unit




AfDB’s Report Provides Details on China-Africa Economic Ties

Tunisia’s Public Debt Nears 26 billion Dinars

Tunisia Central Bank Cuts Interest Rate to Help Sagging Economy

Foreign Investors Scale Back Exposure to Tunisia, Yet Government Insists on Optimistic Outlook

North African Economic Notes


Op-Ed: The Second Arab Revolution Coming: Arab Rulers, You Have Been Warned!

Morocco: A Protest Movement Facing Headwinds

Manipulated, the Vulnerable Touaregs in Search for a Way Forward

Post-Gaddafi Analysis: Deepening Crisis Expected in the Sahel and Beyond

Gaddafi’s Death: Summary Execution is the Most Likely Scenario

Sirte Liberated, Gaddafi Dead

SPECIAL REPORT: DIPLOMACY
French-Algerian Relations: The Weight of History




Despair and Self-Immolation in Algeria





Managing Post Ben Ali: Tunisia Farmers Union at Crossroads

Algeria Agricultural Policy: Case Study of a Government Program Gone Bad